Archived help notes

NOTE: The help notes listed below only apply to certificates generated prior to 1 July 2017, or revision of those certificates if validly lodged with the consent authority.

Window Types

Frame and glass types

Note: The following table showing the frame and glass types in BASIX applies only to certificates generated prior to 1 July 2017, or revision of those certificates if validly lodged with the consent authority.

The U-value column represents the heat loss/heat gain of the system (frame + glass). The lower the U-value the better the glass will resist heat flow in and out of the window.

The Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC) column represents the ability of the system to reduce solar heat gain. Selecting a low SHGC system will reduce your cooling loads but will also cut out some solar gain and may therefore increase your heating loads depending on the orientation, shading and climate zone.

 

Frame and glass 

U-value    

SHGC    

standard aluminium, single clear

7.63

0.75

improved aluminium, single clear

6.44

0.75

standard aluminium, single toned

7.57 0.57

improved aluminium, single toned

6.39 0.56

standard aluminium, single pyrolytic low-e

5.70 0.47

improved aluminium, single pyrolytic low-e

4.48 0.46

standard aluminium, double clear

5.34 0.67

improved aluminium imp., double clear

4.12 0.66

standard aluminium imp., toned/air gap/clear                      

5.31 0.48

improved aluminium, tned/air gap/clear

4.09 0.47

timber or uPVC, single clear

5.71 0.66

timber or uPVC, single toned

5.67 0.49

timber or uPVC, single pyrolytic low-e

3.99 0.40

timber or uPVC, clear/air gap/clear

3.67 0.59

timber or uPVC, toned/air gap/clear

3.64 0.42

What is an 'improved aluminium' frame?

The distinction between a standard and improved aluminium frame is performance based - i.e. improved frames have a lower U-value. This distinction allows window manufacturers to have products that meet the U-value criteria with a range of design and construction options. Many popular aluminium windows will meet the improved performance level. Selecting an improved aluminium frame will improve your heating load without increasing costs because that is what you are likely to be buying anyway. You will need to provide certification of the U-value and SHGC, which is readily available from these manufacturers.

Certifying the windows and glazed doors in your dwelling

The BASIX Certificate will display the U-value and SHGC for the frame and glass types that you have selected.

For standard aluminium and standard timber/uPVC frames with clear or toned glass, you are not required to provide certification of the U-value and SHGC of the windows installed in your dwelling, although the description must match. This is to allow for worst case aluminium windows and handmade timber windows that often are not tested. This policy is likely to change in the futures as the industry becomes more familiar with certification of windows.

For all other frame and glass types:

  • The U-value of the window or glazed door you select must be lower than the value shown
  • The SHGC of the window or glazed door you select must be +/- 10% of the value shown.
  • The description is included as a reminder of the type you selected. It is not mandatory to match the description (refer below) and is not sufficient on its own. For these types, you must provide certification of the U-value and SHGC under NFRC conditions (refer below).

Frame and glass type not in the list?

You can still use another system if you know its U-value and SHGC even if the description does not match. Select the system in the list that has a U-value higher than your type and within 10% of the SHGC of your type.

If you have single sheet obscure glass, select 'single toned' with the appropriate frame.

If you are using glass bricks, select 'double clear' with improved aluminium frame.

 

Suspended floor concession

Note. This help note applies only to certificates generated prior to 1 July 2017, or revision of those certificates if validly lodged with the consent authority.

BASIX gives a concession to dwellings that have little or no choice but to have a suspended floor due to site constraints, such as a sloping site, flood-prone area ormine subsidence area.

Suspended floors of any construction tend to have lower thermal performance than slab on ground floors. For both circumstances, BASIX increases the maximum heating and cooling loads.

Site slope > 10% below ground floor

The selected suspended floor has a site slope greater than 10% directly below all or part of that floor.

If a flat area is created under part of the floor for a garage or carport, the concession can still be claimed provided some part of the area under the floor has a greater than 10% slope.

You can select another floor type that is slab on ground or a suspended floor with flat ground below and still claim the concession for the suspended floor.

Your drawings MUST show the sloping site. It is good practice to show the calculated site slope to confirm that it is greater than 10%. As a minimum, the site slope must be able to be calculated by the consent authority.

Flood-prone area

The dwelling is required to have a suspended floor due to it being located in a flood-prone area.
Evidence to support the requirement for a suspended floor must be provided to the consent authority.

Mine subsidence area

The dwelling is required to have a suspended floor due to it being located in a mine subsidence area.
Evidence to support the requirement for a suspended floor must be provided to the consent authority.

Suspended floor concession - sloping site with calculated site slope greater than 10%Suspended floor concession - sloping site with calculated site slope greater than 10% 

 

Grouping Windows

Note: This help note applies only to certificates generated prior to 1 July 2017, or revision of those certificates if validly lodged with the consent authority.

The DIY tool allows up to 15 different window types/combinations to be entered.

Where there are more than 15 individual windows, windows of the same type and orientation need to be grouped together. When combining windows into groups, the following rules apply:

  • must have the same orientation – that is, be on the same building elevation.
  • have the same frame and glass type
  • have the same level and type of shading, overshadowing or eaves overhang.

To enable the grouped windows to be identified on the plans and elevations submitted to the consent authority, group windows should be clearly identified in the BASIX window schedule and include the name/number applicable to all windows in the group as shown in the example below:

 Screen shot of Windows and Skylight details

Failure to clearly identify grouped windows may result in the PCA not being able to finalise the BASIX completion receipt and certify the works.

If it is not possible to restrict the number of grouped windows 15 or less (that is, there are more than 15 different combinations of window types and orientation), then the Simulation Method must be used to satisfy the thermal comfort section of BASIX.

 

Rapid method

Note:. This help note applies only to certificates generated prior to 1 July 2017, or revision of those certificates if validly lodged with the consent authority.

Rapid is a quick compliance method aimed at simple, single-storey, (usually) brick veneer dwellings that are common in regional NSW and parts of Sydney.

It provides a set of easy-to-understand criteria which allows a 'rapid' Pass in Thermal Comfort, avoiding the need to engage a consultant. The insulation levels and eave projections differ depending on the postcode (climate zone).

In order to use the Rapid method, the dwelling must meet the following criteria:

  • the dwelling is single storey;
  • the dwelling has a slab-on-ground floor or, if the floor is suspended, the floor meets BASIX insulation requirements for the climate zone;
  • the external walls are brick veneer, or framed and externally clad with weatherboards or fibre-cement;
  • the external walls have insulation that meets the BASIX insualtion requirements for the climate zone;
  • all windows and glazed doors are shaded by eaves that meet BASIX width requirements for the climate zone;
  • eaves are no more than 500 millimetres above window or glazed door heads;
  • ceilings have insulation that meets the BASIX insulation requirements for the climate zone;
  • the roof has insualtion and ventilation that is appropriate for the climate zone (BASIX may specify sarking or two wind-driven ventilators with eave and or roof vents, depending on the climate); and
  • the total window and glazed door area is no more than that allowed for the climate region, typically around 18% of the floor area.

R‑Values and eave distances that apply to the cimate zone will be specififed in the list of Rapid method conditions. The R-values are the minimum required additional insulation only and do not include the R-value of the construction system (for example, double brick walls).

Select "yes" to confirm that you accept these requirements and that they will be incorporated into the design. This insulation must be installed in accordance with the provisions in 3.12.1.1 of the Building Code of Australia. This insulation should be installed with due consideration of condensation and associated interaction with adjoining building materials. Installing the required insulation may involve changes from the current construction practice of some individual builders.